Introducing Our Latest Print: “Windows into the Still-Wild”

We've Partnered with the National Parks Conservation Association to Celebrate its 100th Anniversary

BOULDER, Colo. — May 2nd, 2019 — Khala and Company makes products to sell a cause.

A Boulder-based business that handcrafts zero waste provisions to replace plastic from the kitchen to the campsite, Khala & CO has dedicated a specially-designed print line of their award winning reusable food wraps, Khala Cloths, to help the National Parks Conservation Association celebrate their Centennial Year.

Khala & CO and the NPCA partnered up through their mutual membership in 1% for the Planet, seeing a profound and obvious connection between the artwork on the “Windows into the Still-Wild” print and NPCA’s 100 year advocacy for the national parks and the wildlife that inhabit them. Based on original artwork by Dr. Tamar McKee, co-founder and co-CEO of the company who is also a trained anthropologist and museum curator, the NPCA-dedicated print features various animals etched with scenes from their habitats. Folks can now wrap and “honor their food” with a reusable food wrap depicting a bear roaming the springtime foothills of the Rocky Mountains, an elk bulging in aspen autumn splendor, and many more. 

NPCA’s mission—to protect and enhance America's National Park System for present and future generations — is just as relevant today as it was 100 years ago at its founding. Soon after it was formed, founder Robert Sterling Yard called NPCA the “fearless and outspoken defender of the people’s parks.”

Khala Cloths steps forward this year to join forces with the NPCA as an adamant defender of our country’s wild places. In addition to donating hundreds of Cloths for Centenniel Year events around the U.S., proceeds from every purchase of a “Windows into the Still-Wild” print go towards supporting the NPCA’s efforts. The prints are available for purchase online and at various stores around the U.S.

Theresa Pierno, President and CEO of National Parks Conservation Association, states:

“To protect our national parks is to protect the democratic ideal. They reflect who we are and the values we hold. National parks exist as they do today, for all of us to experience, because of those who came before us. They stood up for parks when it mattered most. And now it’s our turn to answer the call, for all who experience them now and for those who will come long after us.”