The Founding Ethics of Khala Cloths Beeswax Wraps

New Ways, Old Ways: Beeswax Wraps vs. Plastic

Having children creates a love that is impossible to explain. Because of such love, we realized we needed to do more. We started examining our plastic use. We were washing plastic bags and reusing them but felt there had to be a better, more grassroots way.

Plastics themselves are relativity new, part of what philosopher Donna Haraway would call the “Great Acceleration” of modernity and progress after World War II.... So what did people do before plastic? What did we (do we) throw out by turning to a more plastic-dominated world?

We stared researching, looking back over time and across cultures....and discovered several “old” traditions of food storage alternatives to plastic. Two in particular caught our attention: the use of tree resin to seal earthen or glass containers for long term storage, and the use of wax-infused cloth as removable covering for containers. In North America, such practices of food storage were commonplace as little as 100 years ago, but now (like so much of the world) have been heavily supplanted with plastic alternatives. (Think about all the ziplock bags, Saran-wrap, Tupperware, and other plastic food storage items used the world over.)

We started playing with two pre-plastic ingredients in particular – tree resin and beeswax - to infuse cloths with. We were experimenting with how we could update this method to the food storage landscape of the 21st century…

Enter coconut oil. With its natural antibacterial properties, health benefits, and ability to be ethically sourced, it just made sense (and more cloth pliability too!). It then took us a while to create the perfect ratio blend because we wanted to create the most ideal natural alternative to plastic. Slowly but ever so surely, Khala Cloths beeswax wraps were born.

The Great Future... A Less-Plastic World

Sometimes the best solution is one that already existed. We spend so much time trying to make things simpler that we forget to look at its future impact. We often think of the scene in the film, The Graduate, where Denis Hoffman’s character, Ben Braddock, is told by Mr. Maguire, in almost secret, worshipful tones: "Plastics… There's a great future in plastics.”

To us, this scene typifies how plastic started entering both the consciousness and the commodity chain of the mid-20th century. And now here we are, trying to tame this “great future” that's taken over our oceans and is killing the human and greater-than-human world.

What if we started saying something like - “Khala Cloths…There’s a great future in Khala Cloths?” - instead?